Posted on: 04/17/2006
Australia ‘s policy of restricting antibiotic use in food-producing animals may be linked with lower levels of drug-resistant bacteria found in its citizens, according to an article in the May 15, 2006 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, now available online.
Campylobacter jejuni is a leading bacterial cause of foodborne illness in industrialized countries. Drug resistance can make Campylobacter infections difficult for physicians to treat, and can result in longer bouts of diarrhea and a higher risk of serious or even fatal illness. Bacterial resistance to drugs is generally attributed to inappropriate prescribing or overuse of antibiotics.

Continue Reading Less Antibiotic Use in Food Animals Leads to Less Drug Resistance in People, Australian Study Shows

April 2006
Journal of Food Protection, Volume 69, Number 4, April 2006, pp. 932-934(3)
Andersen, Sigrid Rita et al
Abstract:
The occurrence of metronidazole resistance was investigated among Campylobacter jejuni in raw poultry meat collected from supermarkets. MICs were determined by the agar dilution procedure in the testing range of 3 to 60 μg/ml metronidazole.

April 2006
Journal of Food Protection, Volume 69, Number 4, April 2006, pp. 928-931(4)
Meldrum, R.J. et al
Abstract:
A 36-month study of Campylobacter and Salmonella in retail raw whole chicken was carried out to measure baseline rates at the retail level, establish seasonality, and observe changes in rates over time. In total, 2,228 samples

April 2006
Journal of Food Protection, Volume 69, Number 4, pp. 757-761(5)
Scherer, Kathrin et al
Abstract:
The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and numbers of Campylobacter on the skin and in the muscle of chicken legs at retail to examine the external and internal contamination for an exposure assessment. Furthermore,

April 2, 2006
Press Release Newswire
Chicken is one of the most versatile and economical main dishes for people looking for nutritious and easy-to-fix meals. But if not stored, cooked and cleaned correctly, chicken can cause food poisoning and other food-borne illnesses.
Little Rock — “Chicken? Again?” That’s probably one of the most common laments heard over and over at dinnertime in homes throughout Arkansas.
Chicken is one of the most versatile and economical main dishes for people looking for nutritious and easy-to-fix meals. But if not stored, cooked and cleaned correctly, chicken can cause food poisoning and other food-borne illnesses.

Continue Reading Don’t play chicken with health: practice food safety when preparing poultry

February 2, 2006
safefood Press Release
www.safefoodonline.com
Recent research, funded by safefood, has indicated a high occurrence of the food poisoning bacterium, Campylobacter in raw poultry, particularly chicken, with 49.9% of retail samples of raw chicken testing positive for the bacterium.
Speaking about the project, Dr Paul Whyte from UCD, lead Researcher, said ‘The study was carried out to provide all island public health data on Campylobacter. Our research showed that a high proportion of human Campylobacter cases are linked with the handling and consumption of contaminated foodstuffs of animal origin, particularly poultry.
Campylobacter is a common cause of bacterial foodborne infection in many countries including the island of Ireland. Scientists have detected the pathogen in raw poultry produced worldwide’.

Continue Reading Study identifies campylobacter in poultry as risk factor for gastroenteritis in humans

November 28, 2005
Meatingplace.com
Ann Bagel
Bacteriocins — proteins produced by bacteria — can reduce campylobacter in chicken intestines to nearly undetectable levels, according to a study published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service.
The research was led by microbiologist Norman Stern of the USDA Agricultural Research Center in Athens, Ga., and Edward Svetoch of the Russian Federation State Research Center for Applied Microbiology in Obolensk.
Tens of thousands of bacterial isolates from poultry production environments were evaluated in the study. Several were found to have anti-campylobacter activity — namely Bacillus circulans and Paenibacillus ploymyxa.

Continue Reading Research reveals new strategy to reduce campylobacter in chickens

Associated Press
November 18, 2005
WASHINGTON — When Thanksgiving arrives next week, people should be groaning from full stomachs, not food poisoning.
More than 200,000 Americans get sick each day from what they eat, and turkey dinner with all the trimmings complicates it all. The government is offering some tips to keep holiday cooking from becoming an intestinal curse.
At the top of the list is washing your hands often, followed by keeping raw food separate from cooked food, using a food thermometer and storing leftovers in small portions in the fridge.

Continue Reading Tips for turkey with trimmings, minus bacteria

By Charles W. Schmidt
Sep 17, 2005
Mounting evidence suggests that the poultry industry’s use of antibiotics promotes antibiotic resistance among the foodborne bacteria that infect humans. One such bacterium is Campylobacter, a pathogen common to chicken products. Every year more than 1 million Americans develop Campylobacter -induced food poisoning from eating undercooked contaminated chicken. Resistant strains of Campylobacter are a growing public health threat, particularly among elderly and immunocompromised patients. This month, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health provide evidence suggesting that chickens raised without antibiotics are less likely to carry antibiotic-resistant strains of Campylobacter [EHP 113:557-560].
The study focused on fluoroquinolones (FQs), a class of antimicrobials used to control the bacterium Escherichia coli in broiler chickens. Of the two FQs initially approved for use in poultry, Sara Flox WSP and Baytril, only the latter remains on the market. The Food and Drug Administration is seeking to repeal approval for Baytril due to concerns that it contributes to microbial resistance.

Continue Reading Poultry’s Persistence Problem – Drug-Resistant Campylobacter in Chicken

Review: reduction of Campylobacter spp. by commercial antimicrobials applied during the processing of broiler chickens: a review from the United States perspective
August, 2005
Journal of Food Protection: Volume 68, Number 8
Page 1752-1760
Omar A. Oyarzabal
Department of Poultry Science, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849-5416, USA
ABSTRACT
A reduction in Campylobacter spp. has been