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Campylobacter gastroenteritis associated with convulsions: Case report and review of the literature

Journal Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Publisher IOS Press, ISSN 1305-7707 (Print), 1305-7693 (Online), Issue Volume 5, Number 2 / 2010, DOI 10.3233/JPI-2010-0234, Pages 199-201

Authors

Arnon Broides1, Raffi Lev-Tzion1, Eugene Leibovitz2

1Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
2Pediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel

Abstract

We present a case of a child with generalized convulsions and dysentery caused by Campylobacter jejunii and review the pediatric literature published on this topic. Our case, as well as previous reports, suggests that in a child with convulsions and dysentery, the differential diagnosis should include shigellosis and also Campylobacter spp. infection. Because azithromycin provides appropriate coverage for both etiologies and in light of the present case, we suggest that it be considered in addition to parenteral ceftriaxone in severe cases of dysentery with or without convulsions.

  • Bronwen Leith

    I was interested to read about a child having convulsions and dysentery caused by Campylobacter. Yours is the only site I have found that speaks of convulsions. My daughter (age 11) who has since been diagnosed with Campylobacter had a grand mal convulsion. This was the first convulsion she has ever had. Please could someone in the know tell me what would have caused this severe reaction and what we need to watch out for in the future.